Tuesday, May 16, 2017

To Blow or Not to Blow...

If you have been pulled over for a DUI, failed the field sobriety exercises, and told you are under arrest, the next step is submission to a breath test.  You will be asked if you will submit to a breath test.  You can refuse.  You have to determine if this is the best choice for you in the moment.  

If you refuse to submit to a breath test, your driver's license will automatically be suspended for a year in Florida.  If it is your second refusal, the Department will suspend your driver's license for 18 months and the State Attorney's office can charge you with a first-degree misdemeanor just for the refusal.  Driving is considered a privilege in Florida, not a right.

DUIs can be proven without a BAC, blood alcohol content level. The statute reads that a person is guilty of driving under the influence if the person:

1) is in actual physical control of a vehicle, AND

2) a) the person is under the influence of alcoholic beverages, any chemical substance in section 877.111, or any substance controlled under chapter 893, when affected to the extent that the person's normal faculties are impaired;

   b) the person has a blood alcohol level of 0.08 or more; OR

   c) the person has a breath alcohol level or 0.08 or more.

Therefore, in addition to number 1, only a, b, or c needs to be met.  If you find yourself in this situation, it is imperative that you hire an experienced defense attorney to help you defend against your DUI charges. There may be issues with your traffic stop to begin with.  Did the officer have probable cause to pull you over?  Is there a motion to suppress issue?  If you did submit to a breath test, were there any technical issues with the machine?  These are all issues that an experienced DUI attorney can help you with.

Contact Heather Bryan Law today at 863-825-5309, or online, for your consultation.  We are here to help!

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Think Before You Post

Documenting our lives on social media has become second nature.  When an event occurs, we immediately take a picture and post it to some sort of social media account.  Most people do not consider the legal consequences of what they put on their social media accounts.

I recently put a meme on Instagram that read, “Dance like no one is watching; email like it may one day be read aloud in a deposition.”  I would apply this quote to all social media outlets.  If you would not want what you are about to post to be read aloud in a deposition or shown to a jury one day in open court, it is probably best not to post it.

The courts have had to rule on privacy issues when it comes to Facebook and other social media outlets.  The trend has been, in federal courts and in Florida, that if you choose to post something on social media, you are waiving your privacy, even if you have your privacy settings set to the most private.  The courts have rationalized that you are putting it out there for the world to see; and therefore, you are waiving your constitutional privacy rights.

For example, if you have been injured in a car accident and are involved in personal injury litigation, defense counsel will more than likely request that you produce all social media pictures from the date of injury to present.  The courts have ruled this request is relevant as it can show whether in fact you are injured.

Courts have issued similar rulings in all types of litigation from family cases to criminal cases.  There must be a finding of relevance, which is not hard to do.

One final piece of advice, if you know you are preparing for litigation, it is a very bad idea, to think, “I need to clean up my social media accounts.”  If you start deleting posts and pictures, you are destroying potential evidence.  This could get you into more trouble, and is potentially illegal.  Keep your accounts to the most secure settings, and just think before you post.

Heather Bryan is an experienced criminal and family lawyer.  Contact us online or call us at 863-825-5309 for your consultation.